Temple University Offers a Lesson in Information Security

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I bear no responsibility for the title…..

 

Here it is, as published in July 2005, on ZDNET.com…and yes, it was done for Symantec.

 

Temple University Offers a Lesson in Information Security


Temple University is one of the largest public universities in the U.S., with only four information security employees, yet its network was not infected by the SoBig and MyDoom worms that brought countless corporations and academic institutions to their knees. Its extraordinary success is the result of the University’s ongoing efforts and lessons learned in combining people, processes, and technology to protect students and University assets without compromising academic freedom.

 

The Challenge

Until September 2002, computer security at Temple University in Philadelphia was limited to securing
mainframes and providing disaster recovery. However, as information security threats increasingly focused on the
Internet and networked systems, and as federal laws were passed requiring greater network security for public and
private organizations, the University—led by Temple’s vice president for computer and information systems—made the unusual decision to designate a chief information security officer, or CISO. Ariel Silverstone, with over 15 years in the computer industry and experience consulting nationally and internationally for Fortune 1000 firms, was appointed to the role.

For Temple, having a CISO on board was a significant prerequisite for implementing a proactive security
infrastructure that would enable the University to address complex information security threats that inevitably
become more pervasive and destructive over time. This was even more important since Temple University has
over 10,000 employees; 33,000 students; 14,000 networked PCs; and a hybrid wired/wireless network—and just four information security (IS) employees.


The Solution

Under Silverstone’s direction, and with input from a security roundtable consisting of various University
constituencies, the information security team developed and implemented a comprehensive computer and network security policy. This policy established appropriate security requirements and restrictions on accessing and using University computers, computer systems, and networks and safeguarding University information.

Among other responsibilities, users of Temple computers, systems and networks are explicitly accountable for
understanding and complying with the university’s information-security policies and for demonstrating due
diligence in protecting the integrity and privacy of data therein. They are also tasked with ensuring the local
security of any system they use to connect to the University network and of reporting security lapses to
the CISO or system administrator.

 

Creating a culture of security

The scarcity of professional IT support resources and the abundance of employees and students requiring support led the Temple IS team to make another important decision: to enlist the help of students and faculty in
protecting information resources by creating a culture of security. With each individual user following best practices for information security, Temple can head off many potential problems.

The IS team implemented an awareness campaign with posters, customized candy dispensers, and other popular paraphernalia promoting safe computing. It installed plasma screens at popular gathering places and played information-security focused infomercials. It also launched a series of seminars covering IT and related
issues, including security. The team started small, offering just two classes in order to gauge students’ interest in
attending non-credit classes on their own time. The classes were so successful that a variety of seminars are now
offered at the beginning of every semester, with a growing number of these classes targeting security issues.

 

Supporting awareness with technology

The IS team backed up its awareness campaign with technology, providing students with a standardized
antivirus solution at no cost. Symantec AntiVirusTM Corporate Edition was made available to students via CDs
and downloads from the University’s Web site. The IS department also set aside certain days during which
students could bring their laptops in and the IT staff would install the antivirus software for them. In addition, for a
nominal fee, students could purchase a copy of the software for home use. University IT personnel managed
the configuration, verification, and updating of the antivirus software, thereby assuring that users were appropriately protected against new and emerging threats.

Furthermore, only users with updated, properly configured antivirus software were allowed to connect to the
school’s network. Unprotected devices were automatically identified as they attempt to connect to the network and
prohibited from connecting. The IS team sent consultants to check the unprotected or misconfigured systems to
make sure Symantec’s antivirus software was installed correctly.

 

Temple University security put to the test

Even as the University made significant progress toward securing the information and systems of students, faculty and staff, the information-security team’s efforts were challenged during the summer of 2003.

In July, a security bulletin was released describing a major vulnerability in the Windows operating system. Just one day later, Temple’s IS team assessed the threat as easy to exploit and widespread, in turn deciding that it was a critical issue that had to be addressed. In response, Silverstone’s team issued a campus-wide e-mail message
to 55,000 recipients, warning people to update Windows immediately.

Less than a month later, the Blaster blended threat hit the Temple University network. Blaster is a worm that targets the aforementioned vulnerability in Windows’ implementation of Remote Procedure Calls. The worm then launches a denial-of-service attack against Web sites such as windowsupdate.com and can deluge a network it uses to facilitate its attacks. Within four hours of being detected within the Temple network, 600 unprotected computers were identified as infected, and the network was slowed to a snail’s pace.

The IS team responded by dispatching all technical support representatives while also asking nearly 100 other
employees to assist in fighting the worm. The University disconnected infected computers from the network. With
fall semester move-in day fast approaching for 6,000 computer-laden students, the team accelerated its
antivirus installation process for all students, faculty, and staff.

 

Customer Benefits

Because they had implemented a well-written security policy, had cultivated a more security-conscious
environment, and had protection tools installed on many systems, Silverstone’s team was able to minimize the
impact of a potentially debilitating attack. The event did, however, impel Silverstone to accelerate the team’s plans
to install an effective antivirus solution campus-wide.

By November 2003, almost 90 percent of Temple’s network-connected computers were protected with the
University’s standardized Symantec software, and nearly all were performing scheduled scans and were routinely
and automatically updated. Furthermore, by January 2004, all but 0.1 percent of computers on Temple’s network had the antivirus software installed and running. More importantly, by then, the SoBig and MyDoom worms, having grabbed international headlines with their impact, had come and gone at Temple University without causing a stir.

Today, Temple University’s security team continues to enforce its information security policies while helping
students, faculty, and staff participate in maintaining a security-aware culture. By leveraging technology tools and
information security best practices, the University is able to provide a safe environment for learning and discovery.

“The SoBig and MyDoom worms did not infect a single system on our University’s comprehensive network.
Temple’s security infrastructure is also saving big money and significant resources. During the last six months, the
University saved an estimated $25 million by eliminating the cost of 1,300 service calls per day over the course of
200 days.” – Ariel Silverstone, Temple University CISO




 


Temple University Offers a Lesson in Information Security
Benefits Offered by Symantec AntiVirus Corporate Edition
• Prevented a single system within Temple’s comprehensive network from being infected by SoBig and MyDoom
• Protects against new and emerging threats
• Performs scheduled scans and automatic updates
• Helps ensure safe learning environment
Temple University is one of the largest public universities in the U.S., with only four information security employees, yet its
network was not infected by the SoBig and MyDoom worms that brought countless corporations and academic institutions
to their knees. Its extraordinary success is the result of the University’s ongoing efforts and lessons learned in combining
people, processes, and technology to protect students and University assets without compromising academic freedom.
The Challenge                                                      The Solution
Until September 2002, computer security at Temple                  Under Silverstone’s direction, and with input from a
University in Philadelphia was limited to securing                 security roundtable consisting of various University
mainframes and providing disaster recovery. However, as            constituencies, the information security team developed
information security threats increasingly focused on the           and implemented a comprehensive computer and network
Internet and networked systems, and as federal laws were           security policy. This policy established appropriate
passed requiring greater network security for public and           security requirements and restrictions on accessing and
private organizations, the University—led by Temple’s vice         using University computers, computer systems, and
president for computer and information systems—made                networks and safeguarding University information.
the unusual decision to designate a chief information
security officer, or CISO. Ariel Silverstone, with over 15         Among other responsibilities, users of Temple computers,
years in the computer industry and experience consulting           systems and networks are explicitly accountable for
nationally and internationally for Fortune 1000 firms, was         understanding and complying with the university’s
appointed to the role.                                             information-security policies and for demonstrating due
diligence in protecting the integrity and privacy of data
For Temple, having a CISO on board was a significant               therein. They are also tasked with ensuring the local
prerequisite for implementing a proactive security                 security of any system they use to connect to the
infrastructure that would enable the University to address         University network and of reporting security lapses to
complex information security threats that inevitably               the CISO or system administrator.
become more pervasive and destructive over time. This
was even more important since Temple University has
over 10,000 employees; 33,000 students; 14,000 networked
PCs; and a hybrid wired/wireless network—and just four
information security (IS) employees